Monday, January 6, 2020

Sweet Dreams #3 Laurie's Song and #4 Princess Amy

Sweet Dreams #3 Laurie's Song, Suzanne Rand, 1981

Laurie Adams isn't sure who she is anymore—a good student who writes beautiful poetry or a star-struck groupie for the local rock band.  She's being pulled apart by two very different boys who are fighting for her affection.

Skip is a budding rock star and the most handsome boy in school.  He wants Laurie to write lyrics for his songs and take the leap to fame and fortune.  Then there's Jeff—a hard-worker determined to do more with his life than just get by on good looks—like Skip.  Jeff wants Laurie to discover life and love on her own terms... and his.

Which boy should Laurie choose... which one will make her happy?

It's not hard to figure out which boy would be better for Laurie.

I definitely read this book when I was young, and I believe it was one of the only two Sweet Dreams books that I read.

This is a very good book.

Sweet Dreams #4 Princess Amy, Melinda Pollowitz, 1981

Spending a month at an isolated summer retreat with her rich relatives didn't sound like much fun to Amy.  But she hadn't counted on being swept off her feet by a boy as handsome and wild as Guy.  His smile and the way he calls her "Princess" make her feel weak all over.  Is Guy serious, or is he just a spoiled rich kid playing with Amy's emotions?

Then there's Peter, so down-to-earth.  His big hand on Amy's shoulder gives her a feeling of security and warmth she's never felt before.  But Peter just works on the island.  He's not one of the fast crowd.

Two incredible boys from two very different worlds... and Amy must choose.


In this book, it's also not hard to figure out which boy would be better.

On page 54, Amy gets a shower, and the water sprays "from each of the eight corners of the hexagonal, glass-walled shower stall."  A hexagon has six sides, not eight, so it would have formed six corners.

This is a very good book.

2 comments:

Pet said...

Since a shower stall has corners at the top and bottom, a hexagonal one would have twelve corners.

Jennifer White said...

That’s true. I did not think about both the top and bottom.