Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Nancy Drew: Twisted Candles and Larkspur Lane

My thoughts will be brief on the ninth and tenth Nancy Drew books, The Sign of the Twisted Candles and The Password to Larkspur Lane.

Near the end of the revised text story for Twisted Candles, I felt that it was not at all logical for all of the relatives to come to the inn late at night. The original text was more logical since Sidney and Boonton were already at the inn, so it was not as much of a stretch for the other relatives to come.

I have always favored the revised text Twisted Candles since a little more time is devoted to Nancy hunting for hidden objects secreted behind the Sign of the Twisted candles. Upon this reading, that part of the revised text did not stand out as much for me, probably because the revised text is so short.

This time, I favored the original text.
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I enjoyed both the original and revised texts of Larkspur Lane. The primary difference between the two stories is that the revised text introduces a subplot with the villains attempting to coerce Morgan into stealing the crystal from the Cornings. I like the subplot with Morgan and thought I would miss it in the original text. I found that the original text is just as good, even with that part missing.

In both versions, Nancy drives her brand-new car into the middle of the woods, hiding it behind bushes. I cannot fathom why Nancy would drive a new car into the woods. The car would likely have been scratched!

In the original text, Nancy sends a message of "S. O. S." via carrier pigeon. In the revised text, the message is changed to "SP at once," which is said to mean "Sailplane at once" and also "Send police at once." Mmm, okay... What was wrong with "S. O. S."? Some revisions make no sense.

While I enjoyed both texts of Larkspur Lane, I favored the original text.

3 comments:

Miranda James said...

These are two of my favorites in the series, the OT versions, though the RT of Larkspur is rather good.

William Land said...

I enjoy both versions of both stories, favouring the original text books over the revised ones.

In Twisted Candles, Bess and George were more than one-dimensional characters. In this story, they experienced realistic feelings - their friendship with Nancy was in jeopardy because of the girl dectective's involvement with the Sidney case. The cousins had very human-like characteristics of jealously and hurt. Of course, it was wonderful when the girls friendship was repaired.

The comment Ned makes in the revised text about Bess being as "friendly as an ice cube" (page 114) is odd. I didn't understand until I was adult reader that he meant she was cold.

Hannah has a great role in the revised book since she accompanies Nancy to the Inn. I found it, odd, however, that she flipped the "back of her skirt over her head" when she and Nancy were attacked by bats. I kept wondering how she could see!

I enjoyed both versions of Larkspur Lane. Helen Corning has a strong role in this original book where as Bess and George have this role in the revised story. I enjoyed the part in the revised book where Bess disguises as a nurse to get Nancy, dressed as an elderly woman, into the gates of the fraudulent sanatorium. Bess is very brave to help Nancy because of her fear. (George is not chosen because she sprained her ankle).

In the original story, Helen is the "nurse" who enters Larkspur Lane with Nancy. It was entertaining to read about Nancy's shopping trip where she purchased, to Helen's puzzlement, appropriate clothes for an old lady and a nurse.

Helen, as a new bride, has a supporting role in the revised story. She brings mystery to Nancy via her grandparents who are frightened by a sinister wheel of blue fire appearing after dark near their home. Nancy investigates and discovers this wheel is connected to her other mystery.

It is always wonderful to see Effie Schneider, a well-meaning, but clumsy girl who sometimes helps Hannah as a maid at the Drew home. Effie provides comic relief, but is not as annoying as Cora, the household maid in the Dana Girls series.

William Land said...

I enjoy both versions of both stories, favouring the original text books over the revised ones.

In Twisted Candles, Bess and George were more than one-dimensional characters. In this story, they experienced realistic feelings - their friendship with Nancy was in jeopardy because of the girl dectective's involvement with the Sidney case. The cousins had very human-like characteristics of jealously and hurt. Of course, it was wonderful when the girls friendship was repaired.

The comment Ned makes in the revised text about Bess being as "friendly as an ice cube" (page 114) is odd. I didn't understand until I was adult reader that he meant she was cold.

Hannah has a great role in the revised book since she accompanies Nancy to the Inn. I found it, odd, however, that she flipped the "back of her skirt over her head" when she and Nancy were attacked by bats. I kept wondering how she could see!

I enjoyed both versions of Larkspur Lane. Helen Corning has a strong role in this original book where as Bess and George have this role in the revised story. I enjoyed the part in the revised book where Bess disguises as a nurse to get Nancy, dressed as an elderly woman, into the gates of the fraudulent sanatorium. Bess is very brave to help Nancy because of her fear. (George is not chosen because she sprained her ankle).

In the original story, Helen is the "nurse" who enters Larkspur Lane with Nancy. It was entertaining to read about Nancy's shopping trip where she purchased, to Helen's puzzlement, appropriate clothes for an old lady and a nurse.

Helen, as a new bride, has a supporting role in the revised story. She brings mystery to Nancy via her grandparents who are frightened by a sinister wheel of blue fire appearing after dark near their home. Nancy investigates and discovers this wheel is connected to her other mystery.

It is always wonderful to see Effie Schneider, a well-meaning, but clumsy girl who sometimes helps Hannah as a maid at the Drew home. Effie provides comic relief, but is not as annoying as Cora, the household maid in the Dana Girls series.